Is Your Banking Job Gone Soon?

BankingJobsGone

Fintech is steaming ahead at an incredible pace. What robots used to be for the automotive industry, algorithms have become to the banking industry.

Common wisdom had it that one’s job would be secure if one was well educated and kept up-to-date on the job. Now, however, we are increasingly facing a situation when even highly sophisticated occupations such as personal finance advisors as well as accountants and auditors will fall prey to digitalization.

The Future of Employment

In their 2013 study “The Future of Employment” Karl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne estimated the probability of computerization for 702 professions based on three factors: perception and manipulation tasks, creative intelligence tasks and social intelligence tasks.

Applied to Banking

Of those occupations examined by Frey and Osborne I have extracted those that I find relevant to the banking industry. The percentage figure displayed indicates the likelihood of that profession being computerized in “a decade or two”, i.e. between 2023 and 2033.

Occupation: Probability of Computerization

Sec., Commod., and Fin. Services Sales Agents: 1.6%
Financial Managers: 6.9%
Management Analysts: 13.0%
General and Operations Managers: 16.0%
Financial Analysts: 23.0%
Business Operations Specialists, All Other: 23.0%
Managers, All Other: 25.0%
Financial Specialists, All Other: 33.0%
Economists: 43.0%
Customer Service Representatives: 55.0%
Personal Financial Advisors: 58.0%
Administrative Services Managers: 73.0%
Loan Interviewers and Clerks: 92.0%
Accountants and Auditors: 94.0%
Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks: 97.0%
Tellers: 98.0%
Loan Officers: 98.0%
Credit Analysts: 98.0%
Brokerage Clerks: 98.0%
Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks: 98.0%
New Accounts Clerks: 99.0%
Data Entry Keyers: 99.0%

Source: Frey, C. B., & Osborne, M. A. (2013). The future of employment. Oxford, UK: Oxford Martin Programme on Technology and Employment.

Dr. Patrick Schüffel, A.Dip.C., M.I.B., Dipl.-Kfm.
Professsor
Institute of Finance
Haute école de gestion Fribourg
Chemin du Musée 4
CH-1700 Fribourg
patrick.schueffel@hefr.ch, www.heg-fr.ch

Luxembourg is on a FinTech Journey

PwC Press Release, 21 April 2016

According to the PwC Luxembourg Report, the Grand Duchy is an emerging FinTech innovation hub

FinTech, a game-changing alloy of technology and finance, blends innovation-focused technology companies with traditional financial sector players. The merger of these two different business approaches, the tech and the traditional one, is the bedrock of the future financial sector landscape. Luxembourg, with its modern financial institutions, is well positioned to take reigns of the FinTech revolution.

Adapting to change: rising FinTech awareness in Luxembourg

With its vibrant ecosystem of financial institutions, technology companies, R&D centres, and a highly diversified and specialised economy, Luxembourg is an emerging FinTech innovation hub. “The country already provides factual support to innovation by encouraging private and public funding, and by building up a true start-up support ecosystem: the government put FinTech as one of the six key domains of the Digital Lëtzebuerg Strategy launched in 2014, aimed at turning Luxembourg into a digital nation, and mandated Jeremy Rifkin to examine and advise on how the Grand Duchy can leverage its FinTech potential” says Gregory Weber, FinTech Leader at PwC Luxembourg.

The Grand Duchy provides an attractive ecosystem not only for FinTech companies, but for business in general. Adding its innovative and responsive regulatory environment, Luxembourg is the epitome of a FinTech aware business environment. Local market players seem to perfectly understand that by embracing the FinTech business model, the Grand Duchy is on the right path to further strengthen its recognition and reputation among investors, clients and the start-up community.

Internet, mobility, social networking and the rise of price comparison websites have changed the game over the past decade and have created a new generation of customers who demand simplicity, speed and convenience in their interactions with financial providers and even with their peers” highlights Gregory Weber. Traditional market players have started adapting to new market demands. The need to meet changing customer expectations with new offerings (resulting in an increased focus on the client experience) is top-of-mind for 86% of Luxembourg respondents when asked about the most important impact of FinTech on their business.

Business at risk: 26% of the traditional financial sector in Luxembourg may be lost to FinTechs

According to the survey, nearly all (94%) respondents from the traditional financial industry believe that part of their business is at risk of being lost to standalone FinTech companies. Incumbents believe that more than a fourth part (26%) of their business could be at risk due to further development of FinTech, though FinTech companies anticipate that they will be able to take over only 10% of incumbents’ business (compared to 33% globally). “In this regard, the asset & wealth management industry is feeling particular pressure from FinTech companies” adds Gregory Weber.

On the other hand, insurers in Luxembourg may be underestimating the threat posed by FinTech with an estimated share of business at risk of only 10%, compared to 21% for global insurance participants.

However, not only are traditional financial industry providers concerned about losing part of their business to FinTechs, they are also aware that their ways of working and product offerings will be challenged and possibly transformed.

Blockchain: high on the agenda in Luxembourg, but still underexplored

Blockchain represents the next evolutionary jump in business process optimization technology. If blockchain gains wider acceptance, it could lead to significant changes in back-office roles, as ownership could be transferred without the need for intermediaries and reconciliations would disappear once there is a shared ledger that all parties agree on. “In Luxembourg, the majority of respondents (60%) recognises blockchain’s importance and is much more willing to respond to blockchain when compared to global respondents (except for asset & wealth managers). However, none of the respondents declares being extremely familiar with the technology. Only 17% believes being very familiar with it while one in five Luxembourg industry players is not familiar with blockchain at all” highlights Gregory Weber.

The ability to collaborate, at both a strategic and business level, with a few key partners could soon become a competitive advantage of Luxembourg financial industry.

How is the Luxembourg financial sector dealing with FinTechs?

Almost half (44%) of Luxembourg financial sector players believes that FinTech is integrated at the heart of their corporate strategies. However, more than 50% either does not have a fully aligned corporate FinTech strategy or FinTech does not have any role or impact within the strategic corporate agenda.  There is no clear industry-wide trend in terms of how traditional players deal and engage with FinTechs. More than a third (34%) engages in joint partnerships with FinTech companies, 31% buys and sell services to FinTech companies, 14% rebrands purchased FinTech services (white-labelling), 14% launches their own FinTech subsidiaries, one in ten establishes start-up programs to incubate FinTech companies and 7% sets up venture funds to fund FinTech companies. Surprisingly, 21% of Luxembourg participants does not deal with FinTech at all. When both parties (traditional financial and FinTech companies) are asked about the biggest impediments when dealing with one another, incumbents name regulatory uncertainty (68%), IT security (45%) and differences in operational processes (45%). FinTechs, on the other hand, are mostly concerned about different management culture when dealing with incumbents (67% of respondents) and IT security (50%) is also a concern.

While the responses from Luxembourg participants are generally aligned with the global ones, the required financial investments for Luxembourg FinTechs when dealing with traditional financial companies (50%) clearly stand out. Globally, this issue is FinTechs’ smallest concern, raised only by 28% of survey participants.

FinTech is re-shaping the financial sector at such a pace that those players that stay behind today might not even recognise the sector in five years. With their potential, Luxembourg players, however, have all the capabilities to stay at the heart of the FinTech revolution. The golden rule: start embracing FinTech now” concludes Gregory Weber.

 

Legend:Gregory Weber, FinTech Leader PwC Luxembourg – Nicolas Mackel, CEO Luxembourg for Finance – Jonathan Prince, Co-Founder Digicash Payments SA – Romain Godard, Partner PwC Strategy& – Patrick Schüffel, COO, Saxo Bank AG – Nasir Zubairi, Entrepreneur/Investor

Notes to Editors:

About the report :

The 2016 PwC Global FinTech Survey gathers the view of 544 respondents from 46 countries, principally Chief Executive Officers (CEOs), Heads of Innovation, Chief Information Officers (CIOs) and top management involved in digital and technological transformation, distributed among five regions.

The Luxembourg-focused cut was based on the responses of 36 respondents from the financial industry’s major market players.

For a copy of the report and to see the full results, please visit www.pwc.lu

Innovationskultur: Scheitern inbegriffen

schweizer-bank

vom 18.11.2015, von Madeleine Stäubli-Roduner

 

Bei tiefgreifenden Innovationen agieren viele Finanz­institute zögerlich. Sie könnten ein viel grösseres Potenzial ausschöpfen. Dafür müssen sie Innovationskultur von oben gezielt fördern und Impulse von aussen einbeziehen.

So funktioniert ein direktes Finanzierungssystem mit starker Kundenanbindung zu beiderseitigem Nutzen: Die US-amerikanische Firma Loyal3 bietet ihren Kunden an, Aktien von favorisierten Unternehmen unbürokratisch auf Facebook zu erwerben. Die Kosten sind drei Klicks. Während sich die «Liker» einen Dauerauftrag für den monatlichen Aktienkauf einrichten können, bringen verkaufswillige Unternehmen ihre Apps direkt auf ihrer Facebook-Site an. Diese verblüffende Idee wurde nicht in einem Finanzinstitut geboren.

Mit den dynamischen Fintech-Firmen können Banken im Kreativi­täts-Ranking kaum mithalten. Zwar an­erkennen Finanzinstitute, dass In­no­vationen unverzichtbar sind, aber an ihren bewährten Strukturen wollen sie meist festhalten. Zu diesem Befund kommt eine Umfrage der Swisscom bei 22 Schweizer Banken. Die Gründe für Innovationsbarrieren sind zahlreich: Oft werden Projektaufträge nur vage beschrieben, sodass ein ungezielter Aktionismus entsteht. Lange Entscheidungswege bremsen die Innovationskraft. Angestammtes Silodenken, starre Hierarchien und finanzielle Anreizsysteme verunmöglichen, aktiv Veränderungsprozesse angehen und neue Strategien effizient umsetzen zu können. Banken müssten erst lernen, mit Offenheit umzugehen, sagt auch Patrick Schüffel, Adjunct Professor an der Hochschule für Wirtschaft Fribourg: «Das «not invented here»-Syndrom ist noch weit verbreitet und entstammt einer Zeit, als Banken tatsächlich einen signifikanten Informationsvorsprung gegenüber der Aus­senwelt besassen.» Die kompetitiven Vorteile seien in den letzten Jahren massiv geschrumpft.

Mitarbeiter sind extrem kreativ, wenn man sie nur lässt

Doch gerade in herausfordernden Rahmenbedingungen sei ein hohes Mass an Kreativität gefragt, betont Jens-Uwe Meyer, Innovationsexperte und Geschäftsführer der Innolytics in Leipzig. Kreativität bedeute aber nicht, besonders ausgefallene Ideen zu entwickeln. Vielmehr habe ein Erfinder wie Thomas Edison seine Erfindungen genau um bestehende Regularien herum entwickelt. Auch Marco Abele, Leiter Digital Private Banking bei der Credit Suisse, will Innovation weitreichender definieren. «Innovation entsteht oft gerade dann, wenn äussere Einflüsse einem aufzwingen, gewisse Prozesse oder Modelle zu überdenken. Innovation ist insofern nichts anderes als die Lösung eines Problems.» Ob es nun um fortschreitende Digitalisierung, veränderte Kundenbedürfnisse, regulatorische Anforderungen oder Kostenfragen gehe – das seien alles gute Gründe dafür, innovative Lösungen zu finden.

Für solche Lösungen fehlt es den Finanzinstituten laut Meyer keinesfalls an fähigen Mitarbeitern: So hätten die Mitarbeiter einer regionalen deutschen Volksbank in einer der ärmsten Regionen des Landes eine eigene Softwareplattform entwickelt. «Mitarbeiter im Bankenbereich sind extrem kreativ, wenn man sie nur lässt», sagt Meyer. Woran fehlt es denn, damit sich bahnbrechende Einfälle zu neuen Geschäftsmodellen entwickeln können Als zentrale Faktoren nennt Meyer die Führungskräfte: Sie sollten ihre Mitarbeiter ermutigen, neue Ideen zu entwerfen, auch solche, die unrealisierbar und daher als «kreative Kollateralschäden» zu verbuchen seien. Innovation müsse Chefsache sein. Es gebe zahlreiche wissenschaftliche Studien, die nachwiesen, dass Unternehmen, in denen sich die oberste Führungsebene persönlich für Innovation einsetze, deutlich innovativer seien. Entscheidend, so sagt auch Abele, sind der Mut, neue Wege zu gehen und ein Management, das Innovation vorlebt. «Innerhalb des Digital Private Banking fördern wir gezielt innovatives Denken und Handeln, und wir geben den Mitarbeitern auch entsprechende Freiräume, um Ideen anzudenken und umzusetzen.» Nach Ansicht von Dozent Schüffel muss das Management sogar bewusst das Risiko eingehen, dass eine Vielzahl von Innovationen scheitern wird.

Wichtige Impulse kommen in den meisten Fällen von aussen

Um spezifische Ideen zu evaluieren, veranstaltet die Credit Suisse etwa ein internes Innovations-Crowdsourcing. Ebenfalls wichtig sei der Austausch mit kreativen Leuten ausserhalb des Unternehmens, sagt Abele. Dies sei einer der Gründe dafür, dass sich die Credit Suisse am Impact Hub Zürich beteiligt habe. «Dort werden einige unserer Mitarbeiter regelmässig tätig sein, sich vernetzen und an Projekten mit Start-ups und anderen Partnern mitarbeiten.» Dabei gewinnen sie laut Abele Freiheit, Raum und Nahtstellen zu anderen innovativen Organisationen, wodurch Innovation entstehen könne. Auch Hochschullehrer Schüffel ortet grosses Potenzial ausserhalb der Institute. Sie könnten mit einem minimalen Mehraufwand ein wesentlich grösseres Reservoir von Ideen anzapfen, als dies jemals mit internen Innovationsinseln möglich sei. Die sogenannte «Open Innovation» sieht er als eine der effizientesten Methoden für Schweizer Banken. Mit dem Motto «Most smart people don’t work for this firm» werden Kunden mittels Internet-Plattformen in die Ideensuche einbezogen, denn der Kunde wisse, wo der Schuh drücke.

Schüffel hat mit einem Team die erste internationale Open-Innovation-Plattform für Finanzdienstleister entwickelt. Die Resonanz von Seiten der Schweizer Banken sei «bisher sehr zurückhaltend gewesen». Sie hätten wohl Interesse an der Plattform geäussert, jedoch keinerlei Projekte angestossen. Immerhin bauten grosse Bankinstitute immer öfter eigene Innovationsabteilungen auf und seien daher über die Thematik unterrichtet. Nun erwägt Schüffel, die Plattform im ersten Schritt nur firmenintern zu nutzen. «Wenn man bedenkt, dass Banken mitunter auch Tausende von Mitarbeitern in verschiedenen Ländern beschäftigen, könnte eine firmeninterne Verwendung ein grosser erster Schritt in Richtung Open Innovation sein.»

Solche Konzepte sind laut Meyer in vielen Banken noch nicht verbreitet, denn: «Die Angst, sich dem Kunden gegenüber zu öffnen, ist aktuell noch zu gross.» Ein Forschungsprojekt der Hochschule für Wirtschaft Fribourg ortet als hemmende Faktoren einen eklatanten Mangel an Wissen über Innovations-Management-Techniken und fehlende Offenheit für neues Wissen aus neuartigen Quellen. Entscheidungsträger in der Bankenbranche orientierten sich gerne an Peers und fühlten sich damit bestens informiert. «Dabei wird regelmässig übersehen, dass massgebliche Entwicklungen zunehmend ausserhalb der Bankenbranche stattfinden beziehungsweise im Fintech-Sektor», sagt Schüffel. Auch Abele ist überzeugt, dass Banken von Fintech- und Technologieunternehmen lernen könnten, etwa, wie sie ihre Prozesse strukturieren und schnell auf veränderte Bedürfnisse reagieren könnten. «Wir erachten es deshalb für wichtig, auch als Grossbank nah an der Fintech-Szene dran zu sein», so Abele. Letztlich aber könne auch eine innovationsförderliche Kultur nur dann funktionieren, wenn die Führungsetage diese selbst vorlebe.

 

Source: http://www.schweizerbank.ch/de/artikelanzeige/artikelanzeige.asp?pkBerichtNr=188766

Open Innovation: Bloss Fehlanzeige bei Schweizer Banken

 

 

 

Die Schweizer Banken sind noch Lichtjahre von Open-Innovation-Plattformen entfernt. Dabei liessen sich damit zu extrem tiefen Kosten extrem viele grossartige Ideen gewinnen, sagt der Ex-Credit-Suisse-Manager und heutige Finanzprofessor Patrick Schüffel.

Von Patrick Schüffel, Professor an der Hochschule für Wirtschaft Fribourg und Direktor des dortigen Instituts für Finanzen

McDonald’s tut es und BMW auch, Mammut, Coca-Cola und Bosch ebenso wie Procter & Gamble. Sogar Napolen Bonaparte tat es. Sie alle betreiben – oder im Falle Napoleons betrieben – Open Innovation.

McDonald’s lancierte in Deutschland die Aktion «Mein Burger», in der Kunden ihren eigenen Hamburger zustellen konnten. Der Outdoor-Bekleidungshersteller Mammut suchte auf der Open-Innovation-Plattform Atizo nach Ideen für einen neuen wetterfesten Reissverschluss.

Wie Napoleon die Konservendose erfand

Und Coca-Cola ist auf Facebook und mit einer «Happiness App» bei Millionen von Usern auf der Suche nach neuen Marketing Themen. Bei Bosch wird auf der firmeneigenen Open-Innovation-Website vor aller Welt diskutiert, ob man nicht Plastikventilatoren statt Metallventilatoren in Autobauteilen nutzen sollte.

Die Firma Procter & Gamble bediente sich der Experten-Plattform Innocentive, um ihr Multi-Millionen-Dollar-Produkt «Spin Brush» zu kreieren. Und Napoleon schliesslich, schrieb einen Wettbewerb aus, in dem die besten Ideen eingereicht werden sollten, wie man Lebensmittel für seine Truppen besser haltbar zu machen. Ihm verdanken wir die Konservendose.

Die Geschwindigkeit der Ideen

So unterschiedlich die zu Grunde liegenden Fragestellungen auch sein mögen, die Motivation, sich des Open-Innovation-Ansatzes zu bedienen, ist immer identisch: Warum nur ein paar wenige Köpfe auf wichtige Fragestellungen ansetzen, wenn sich ebenso Dutzende, Tausende, ja sogar Millionen mit dieser Fragestellung auseinander setzen könnten.

Dabei besteht der Vorteil dieser Methode nicht nur in der schieren Anzahl von Ideen, welche Firmen damit einsammeln können. Die Geschwindigkeit, mit der Ideen unterbreitet werden, ist ebenfalls höher und der «Fit» der Ideen ist mitunter extrem gross, wenn es sich bei den Ideengebern ebenso um Kunden handelt.

Was machen die Schweizer Banken?

Das Beste dabei ist: Die Kosten, die der Open-Innovation-Ansatz verursacht, sind vergleichsweise gering. Dies ist sicherlich ein Faktor, der gerade in der heutigen Zeit nicht zu vernachlässigen ist.

Und was machen die Schweizer Banken? Fehlanzeige in Sachen Open Innovation. Oder um präzise zu sein, abgesehen von ein paar spärlichen Ausnahmen – Fehlanzeige.

Lichtjahre davon entfernt

Zwar haben die einen oder anderen Schweizer Banken schon die eine oder andere Frage auf der Open-Innovation-Plattform Atizo zur Diskussion gebracht, beispielsweise einen neuen Marketing-Claim. Aber mit diesem punktuellen Einsatz von Open Innovation sind sie noch Lichtjahre davon entfernt, dieses Konzept als festen Bestandteil ihrer Unternehmensprozesse zu betrachten.

Dabei gibt es durchaus Beispiele, wie es gehen könnte. Die Commenwealth Bank of Australia etwa macht mit ihrer «Idea Bank» (Bilder oben) vor, wie man kontinuierlich auch im Bankgeschäft Open Innovation betreiben kann. Seit etlichen Jahren vergibt sie jedes Quartal 10’000 australische Dollar für die beste Idee, die ihr unterbreitet wird.

Banking für das 21. Jahrhundert

Barclays in Grossbritannien hat mit der Website «We’re listening» eine Stelle geschaffen, wo Kunden der Bank ihre Ideen mitteilen können. Unsere österreichischen Nachbarn wiederum haben bei der Sparkasse das S-Lab erschaffen, wo regelmässig Aufrufe an Kunden ergehen, sich mit bestimmten Problemstellungen zu befassen.

Die Avanza Bank in Schweden hat die Internet Initiative «Labs» gestartet, in der wiederum jeder Kunde jegliche Ideen eingeben kann. Auch die russische Sberbank hat mit «Sberbank 21» eine Open-Innovation-Initiative auf den Weg gebracht, um Ideen für das Banking des 21. Jahrhunderts einzusammeln.

Unmengen neuer Ideen

Was ist also los, warum hat Open Innovation nicht schon längst auch in der Schweizer Bankenbranche Einzug gehalten? Die Vorteile liegen doch auf der Hand: Unter vergleichsweise extrem geringen Kosten könnten extrem schnell Unmengen neuer Ideen für das Schweizer Banking generiert werden.

Liegt es eventuell daran, dass wir uns generell mit Neuerungen schwer tun und erst recht mit solch weitreichenden Neuerungen wie Open Innovation?

Leiden an einem Syndrom?

Liegt es an der Kultur der Schweizer Banken, die vielleicht immer noch unter dem «Not invented here»-Syndrom leiden und jeglicher Idee, die von aussen auf die Firma zugetragen wird, misstrauisch gegenüber steht?

Liegt es möglicherweise an einem Hierarchiedenken, das es allenfalls nicht zulässt, dass eventuell ein Kunde eine (bessere) Idee hat, die der Produktexperten der Bank nicht hatte?

Zunächst vielleicht ein Widerspruch

Möglich. Aber all diese Gründe sind es kaum wert, es nicht doch einmal mit Open Innovation zu probieren. Zudem könnte man ja zunächst einmal klein anfangen und Open Innovation innerhalb der Firma praktizieren, auch wenn dies zunächst einmal wie ein Widerspruch in sich aussehen würde.

Warum nicht fachspezifische Fragestellungen einem grösseren Publikum öffnen? Warum nicht eine firmeninterne Website bereitstellen, auf welcher der Kundenberater mit den Experten von Strukturierten Produkten darüber diskutieren kann, ob und wie Hypotheken gegebenenfalls mit solchen Finanzinstrumenten ergänzt werden könnten.

Fast nichts zu verlieren

Warum nicht alle Mitarbeiter befragen, wie mehr Kreditkartenpakete abgesetzt werden könnten. Warum nicht sämtliche Personalkunden – falls Interesse besteht – miteinbeziehen, wenn es darum geht, neue Self-guided Internet-Angebote zu erstellen?

Die Möglichkeiten, die sich den Banken mit Open Innovation bieten, stellen ein ungeahntes Potential dar, das noch nicht einmal ansatzweise abgerufen wurde. Es gibt mit diesem Ansatz fast nichts zu verlieren, aber mit Nicht-Einsatz von Open Innovation eine Menge zu verlieren – im schlimmsten Fall die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit.

Originaltext: hier